Snowshoeing adventures – Manderfeld http://manderfeld.info/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 16:10:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://manderfeld.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-120x120.png Snowshoeing adventures – Manderfeld http://manderfeld.info/ 32 32 Cold Weather RV Camping: Tips for Winter Adventures https://manderfeld.info/cold-weather-rv-camping-tips-for-winter-adventures/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 14:48:21 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/cold-weather-rv-camping-tips-for-winter-adventures/ During the cold winter months, most people like to put their VR‘s and save the campsite for when the weather is nice. But most people aren’t ready to brave snowstorms for the icy taste of winter adventures. If you plan to go camping car in the snow, here are some tips to be well prepared. […]]]>

During the cold winter months, most people like to put their VR‘s and save the campsite for when the weather is nice. But most people aren’t ready to brave snowstorms for the icy taste of winter adventures. If you plan to go camping car in the snow, here are some tips to be well prepared.

A man dressed in winter clothes standing next to a camper van | David McNew / Getty Images

This one is kind of a no-brainer, but there are a few tips that will help you decide how much warm clothes you need and what to prioritize. The main rule of thumb is to pack more than you need because you can still bundle up if you have extra clothes and blankets.


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Three epic adventures you can only have in Canada https://manderfeld.info/three-epic-adventures-you-can-only-have-in-canada/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 02:57:46 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/three-epic-adventures-you-can-only-have-in-canada/ As the floodgates open to international travel in 2022 and Australians plan their Canadian adventure, one thing is certain: they want it to count. If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that every travel experience is special, and there are moments that have the capacity to change your perspective forever. From a White Christmas […]]]>

As the floodgates open to international travel in 2022 and Australians plan their Canadian adventure, one thing is certain: they want it to count.

If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that every travel experience is special, and there are moments that have the capacity to change your perspective forever.

From a White Christmas in the Canadian Rockies to spotting monolithic icebergs and encountering polar bears in the wild, read on for three breathtaking adventures best experienced in Canada.

1. Christmas white magic

A quintessential white Christmas holds a special place near the top of the to-do list for most Australian travelers.

The Canadian Rocky Mountain province of Alberta is an idyllic winter wonderland that will trigger heartwarming nostalgia in anyone who has ever watched a winter Christmas movie on a hot Australian Christmas day.

Spend the holiday season at the quaint Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, surely the intended subject of “Walking in a Winter Wonderland”, where sleigh rides adorned with bells crisscross the shores of frozen Lake Louise between snow-capped pines, and the castle is adorned. of Christmas trees whose balls shine as bright as burning fireplaces.

The neighboring Township of Banff celebrates six weeks of Christmas festivities, including a hot chocolate trail and the Banff Christmas markets. An afternoon on snowshoes, a fondue lunch or an ice walk in Johnston Canyon will make this a Christmas you will never forget.

But don’t take our word for it. Join Brian Johnston as he tumbles into Sugar Plum Fairy’s boudoir on an enchanting Christmas in the Rockies.

2. Come face to face with a polar bear

It’s one thing to see a polar bear on Instagram, it’s another to meet one in the wild (a good distance!) And Canada is one of the few places on Earth where this unique dream becomes. reality.

Fall in love with the awe-inspiring beauty of the subarctic landscapes of Churchill, Manitoba, known as the “Polar Bear Capital of the World,” and feel that keen thrill of excitement when you stand near the mighty polar bear.

Churchill is the only place in the world that offers a polar bear walking tour. Fly by bush plane to one of Churchill Wild’s three exclusive wilderness lodges, each conveniently located in remote areas for the ultimate polar bear safari experience.

Take a daily guided hike through the tundra to see polar bears and other arctic wildlife up close in their natural habitat.

Read on to find out what it feels like to see the ultimate barrier-free arctic predator: Meanwhile in Canada… it’s time to face the polar bears.

3. Hunt the ‘shepherds

Time stands still as you witness the breathtaking spectacle of the colossal parade of mountains of ice along “Iceberg Alley”.

You are here, standing on Canada’s most easterly point in the wild and mystical Atlantic province of Newfoundland and Labrador, where puffins adorn cliffs, wild blueberries line the hills and ancient glacial giants make an annual Arctic procession as a showcase movement of Mother Nature’s best work.

In fact, it was an iceberg just like one of those 10,000-year-old monoliths that sank the Titanic in 1912, just over 600 kilometers off the coast of Newfoundland. Today, locals make good use of icebergs, harvesting the pristine ice to make vodka, beer, gin and rum.

Visit between May and August for the best chance to witness this extraordinary phenomenon.

Paddle along the ‘bergs in a sea kayak and discover the rugged beauty of breathtaking sea caves, coves and fjords, or hike along the coast and admire the glittering ice sculptures as they drift through Iceberg Alley to a soundtrack of boreal songbirds.

From whale watching to icebergs, Newfoundland’s natural sights are as alluring as the living cultures and traditions of its communities, tinged with Irish, English, French and Indigenous influences.

Read on to immerse yourself in the old world charm of L’Anse aux Meadows, with its rich Viking history, rugged, rugged coastline, and salt of the earth figures that make you feel like you never want to leave.


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Thursday Pulpit: Grateful for Eternal Adventures | Opinion https://manderfeld.info/thursday-pulpit-grateful-for-eternal-adventures-opinion/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/thursday-pulpit-grateful-for-eternal-adventures-opinion/ KERRY SCOTT BALDWIN Thursday Chair Because of Jesus, we have so much to be thankful for … even in 2021. As a friend and I approached the ski resort, a voice rang out: “Ski hard, take risks! I looked to my right and saw a tired looking man. Quickly I started to think, who is […]]]>

KERRY SCOTT BALDWIN Thursday Chair

Because of Jesus, we have so much to be thankful for … even in 2021.

As a friend and I approached the ski resort, a voice rang out: “Ski hard, take risks! I looked to my right and saw a tired looking man. Quickly I started to think, who is this guy and why is he talking to us? We assured him that we would ski to the best of our ability. This man then informed us that he had spent the night making snow. He said all the rocks were covered and there was a nice layer of made snow. I asked him if he was going home to sleep, to which he responded enthusiastically: “No, I’m going to ski! A pure and hard.

Ski hard, try your luck. You may have seen the t-shirt that says, “Life is short. Play hard. “Let’s change it to” Life is short. Pray and play hard.

It was Helen Keller who said, “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing. What she argues is that life has to be an adventure to really live. I am okay.

How easy it is to settle into a comfortable consumer life. Oh, I know, “but it’s comfortable!” Don’t take life too seriously. Don’t settle for the boring doldrums of life. There are better. Look around you at all the wonderful things that God has created. Live a little. On second thought, live a lot!

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I’m not saying we should all start the basic jump. What I mean is that we should always appreciate the value of being alive. We need to be open to initiating positive changes in our lives. Make things happen. Try something, maybe spontaneous, outside of our comfort zones. If you are a Christian, share your faith where you wouldn’t otherwise. Trust in God. After all, life comes and goes quite quickly. It is only a temporary life and world.

Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived outside of Jesus, sought and sought true happiness in this world and concluded in Ecclesiastes 12: 8: “Not everything makes sense! He goes on to say that the conclusion of the matter is to honor God and keep his commandments because it is the whole duty of mankind. (Ecclesiastes 12:13)

The Christian life is an exciting adventure. I enjoy so many interesting aspects of my Christian walk – the people, places and things. It is good to know the truth about the world, life and death. As Jesus said to his believers, “The truth will set you free. (John 8:32) What a great feeling to come to Jesus each day and be released.

The old devil is still hungry to see us suffer in this world. He likes to get people to engage in evil adventures that will only bring misery. The Bible says, “Do not be conquered by evil, but overcome evil with good. (Romans 12:21) When we despair in this life, we can find peace in higher thoughts of heaven and eternity.

Jesus promises in John 14: 1-3: “Let not your heart be troubled: you believe in God, believe in me also. In my Father’s house there are many mansions: if it had not been so, I would have told you. I will prepare a location for you. And if I am going to prepare a place for you, I will come back and I will receive you in me; that where I am, you may also be there. He doesn’t say “I could. “Jesus said,” I will come back! That’s exciting!

Can you imagine all the adventures in paradise? How about talking with your angels and finding out all the times they’ve stepped in to help you. Or snuggle up with a real live grizzly bear instead of a teddy bear. Or ski on beautiful paradisiacal mountains. Or explore the galaxies! (Now that feels like an adventure and a half.)

Thanks to Jesus, we can have many eternal adventures ahead. Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. (John 14: 6)

Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today. You might like what you are doing today and can do it again tomorrow. And as you live your life to the fullest, keep your eyes on Jesus.

Kerry Scott Baldwin is an elder with the Seventh-day Adventist Church at Pacific Union College.


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stay on a frozen lake in Sweden or go for an ice walk in Estonia https://manderfeld.info/stay-on-a-frozen-lake-in-sweden-or-go-for-an-ice-walk-in-estonia/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/stay-on-a-frozen-lake-in-sweden-or-go-for-an-ice-walk-in-estonia/ Winter mountaineering Cairngorms The Scottish Highlands are home to the UK’s largest national park, a landscape of mountains, moorlands, rivers and forests, as well as red squirrels and raptors. An immersive week-long mountaineering course will introduce visitors to much of this, while honing their climbing skills under expert guidance. There are five days of hiking […]]]>

Winter mountaineering

Cairngorms

The Scottish Highlands are home to the UK’s largest national park, a landscape of mountains, moorlands, rivers and forests, as well as red squirrels and raptors. An immersive week-long mountaineering course will introduce visitors to much of this, while honing their climbing skills under expert guidance. There are five days of hiking and climbing, with a day off to soothe tired limbs (as well as visits to the sauna in the evening).

A week from January 16th costs £ 799 per person including tuition and B&B fees plus transfers, no-boundaries.co.uk

Coast and cocktails

Pembrokeshire

From the cozy confines of a lodge near Abermawr Beach, guests warm up with hearty Welsh breakfasts and a walk in the woods before plunging into the Pembrokeshire coast. There is surfing, coasting and sea kayaking, depending on your tolerance for cold water, and the option to explore St Davids or RSPB Ramsey Island. Board games and a wood stove keep things toasty warm at the lodge.

Two nights £ 189 from February 4th (group bookings taken from December to January), preseliventure.co.uk/events/adventure-weekends

Citizen science

Shropshire

The Wenlock Edge limestone escarpment stretches approximately 15 miles between Ironbridge and Craven Arms and is home to diverse flora. An investigation into endangered hazel dormice is underway as part of a project that began in 2015. Every fall and winter, volunteers search for hazelnuts with tooth marks to establish the presence of these difficult nocturnal mammals. to find.

Winter walkers and volunteers should register their interest at kate.price@nationaltrust.org.uk. The recently opened Old Hall B&B in Cressage offers double rooms from £ 130 B&B, oldhallcressage.co.uk

Camp kitchen

Aberdeenshire

A trio of voguish chefs make their way to the forest of Glen Dye Estate, southwest of Aberdeen. Over the next three weekends, the American-inspired Forest Camp of Cabins, Airstream Caravan and Cottages welcomes Whyte Rushen (who loves topping oysters with Monster Munch), Yotam co-author Ottolenghi Ixta Belfrage and food photographer. Joe Woodhouse for foraging (river trout, perhaps), wood-fired cooking and demonstrations, as well as hiking, stargazing and wild swimming.

From 45 €, glendyecabinsandcottage.com/winter-chef-residencies

Igloo Kilpisjrvi in ​​Finland (Photo: Filippo Dias / Stars of Scandinavia)

Star gazing

Dumfries and Galloway

Galloway Forest Park is designated a Gold Level International Dark Sky Park for its exceptionally unpolluted skies; over 7,000 stars and planets are visible to the naked eye. If you need some advice on explaining what you’re watching, there are several ways to find it, including a downloadable map and guidebook (forestryandland.gov.scot). The cozy Selkirk Arms Hotel in Kirkudbright hosts a three-day stargazing weekend in February to visit the city’s new Dark Space Planetarium. There will be an astronomy conference, dinners, lectures and night walks.

February 25, £ 289 per person with half board, selkirkarmshotel.co.uk/stargazing-break

Winter wildlife

Norfolk

Gray baby seals – with their snow-white fur and large black eyes – are starting to appear at Blakeney Point on the north Norfolk coast, home to the country’s largest colony (£ 20, boat trips.co.uk). Whooper swans and Bewick also arrive from Iceland and Siberia, settling for the winter in Welney (www.org.uk/wetland-centres/welney), south of King’s Lynn, while the short-billed geese congregate at Snettisham (rspb.org.uk) and snow buntings can be seen on Titchwell Beach (visitnorfolk.co.uk/inspire/norfolks-winter-wildlife-safari.aspx).

The Gunton Arms near Cromer has stylish rooms, a renowned restaurant and views of red deer roaming the park outside. Doubles from £ 95, theguntonarms.co.uk

Soak up seaweed

Ireland

Vitamin-rich seaweed, renowned for its beneficial effect on circulation and for softening the skin, has been harvested on the Atlantic coast of Ireland for its health-promoting properties since the 12th century. There are still several simple public baths in Galway, Sligo, Clare and Mayo counties, where you can sink into a steaming, cloudy porcelain tub filled with silky strands. Voya’s stylish public bath in Strandhill, Co Sligo, elevates tradition with spa treatments (€ 30, voyaseaweedbaths.com). To see the source, Wild Irish Seaweeds in Co Clare will take you to the shore to help with the harvest (€ 30, wildirishseaweeds.com).

Voya baths are offered at the Twelve Hotel in Galway, which offers double rooms from € 150, thetwelvehotel.ie

Night ice road in Estonia (Photo: Urmas Lauri)

Ice driving

Estonia

In addition to numerous highways, Estonia has seven official ice roads, accessible only in January and February when conditions allow safe passage through the Baltic Sea. Mainly connecting the mainland and the western islands, the roads vary in length – the longest ice road, Hiiumaa stretches for 25 km – carrying thousands of cars each year. As part of a winter getaway to explore the capital, Tallinn, visitors can travel one of the ice roads to visit Haapsalu town, Keila-Joa waterfall and the Noarootsi peninsula, with its churches in wood and its Swedish cultural heritage.

Regent Holidays is offering a three night break from £ 525 per person with flights, B & Bs, transfers, a full day of ice driving and a city pass. Ice skating in the lake, cross-country skiing and ice fishing are also possible, vacation-regent.co.uk

Snowshoeing

Albania

You will often have to yourself the snow-capped alpine landscapes of Valbona National Park in northern Albania, near the country’s borders with Montenegro and Kosovo. A small-group snowshoe excursion showcases the tranquil splendours of the park, hiking the glacial valleys for two to five hours a day past waterfalls and evergreen forests, and staying in small cabins. comfortable hosts. There is also a visit beyond the border to the Prizren River in Kosovo – with its mosque churches – and an overnight stay in Radomire, at the foot of Korab, the highest peak in Albania.

Eight days from € 520 pp excluding flights, Responsible Travel.com

Take the night train

Norway

The Nordland Line runs over 450 miles from Trondheim to Bodo, as far north as you can travel by train in Norway, and crosses the Arctic Circle. The journey departs from the beautiful fjords and wooden houses of Trondheim, then passes through the forests and mountains of Saltfjellet on its 10-hour overnight journey to the Arctic coast. In winter, passengers also have the chance to witness the Northern Lights.

Tickets cost from 199 Nkr (£ 18), sj.no

Slumber party on the frozen lake

Finland

Lake Inari is the largest lake in Finland’s cultural region of Sápmi, and when it freezes in winter, it is possible to walk, skate or snowmobile to its many islands. An exciting way to experience the Lapland landscape is to sleep in an Esko cabin – a heated basket on skis with a bed and toilet, which can be carried across the ice by snowmobile. Sauna, ice fishing, dog sledding and sleigh rides can also be arranged.

From £ 331 per night for two, canopyeandstars.co.uk

Husky sled in Norway (Photo: Tromso Vilmarkssenter / Stars of Scandinavia)

Moonbikes and Yetis

France

The French Alps will be teeming with skiers again this winter, but there is much more to do than skiing and snowboarding. New this winter in Val d’Isère, moonbikes: electric snowbikes that transport passengers along snow-covered paths and through the forest towards the hamlet of Laisinant. Children will love the new Mountain Yeti course which will teach them to respect nature through snowshoeing in the Boisses forest, building igloos and trapper activities, completed with a marshmallow toast.

Moonbiking 70 € pp for one hour, mountain yeti from 55 € pp, evolution2.com

Ice climbing and tobogganing

Switzerland

The frozen waterfalls in and around the glitzy Swiss resort town of Verbier form a picturesque playground for climbers in winter. Mountain guides direct you to the most beautiful waterfalls in the Val de Bagnes, armed with ice picks, ropes and crampons and offer courses for novices or advice to help experienced climbers. Those who still have energy to spare can try
The 7 km long toboggan run at La Tzoumaz starts at the Savoleyres cable car summit station, which descends 711 m in its hairpin bends.

Ice climbing from SFr180pp (£ 150), verbier4vallees.ch

Cross-border adventure

Lapland

Most visitors to the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia focus on a single country, but it is possible to switch from Norway to Finland for a short trip full of adventures. Departing from the Norwegian coastal town of Tromso, he starts off with a husky sled in search of the Northern Lights, then moves to Kilpisjarvi in ​​Finland where a glass-roofed cabin offers spectacular accommodation. A full-day fat bike tour takes guests to the border of Norway, Finland and Sweden before heading to another glass-roofed lodge in Rovaniemi and an encounter with reindeer and Sami herders .

Five nights from £ 1,795 per person excluding flights, offthemap.travel/stars-of-scandinavia/

Read more

15 best adventure vacations to the United States when the UK travel ban ends, from the red carpet in LA to the Rocky Mountains

Sleep in a wooden skyscraper

Sweden

Skelleftea in Swedish Lapland is known for its mining industry, but also for a 20-story wooden building that opened last month. Inside is the Sara Cultural Center, which will host exhibitions and concerts, while across the entire building is the Wood Hotel, crowned with a rooftop spa. Nearby activities include snowshoeing with huskies (Skr 1,000 / £ 85, openlappland.com) and skiing in Vitbergsbacken (visitskelleftea.se).

Doubles from 1,500 Skr (£ 130) B&B, elite


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Adventures of Charlee and Magnolia Book Signing | Calendar https://manderfeld.info/adventures-of-charlee-and-magnolia-book-signing-calendar/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:33:55 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/adventures-of-charlee-and-magnolia-book-signing-calendar/ Elementary teacher Julie Turnipseed, English Learner (ELL) from the Wentzville School District, recently announced the introduction of two new books in her The Adventures of Charlee and Magnolia series. Turnipseed’s easy-to-read rhyming children’s books were published by Inovie Books and illustrated by Muthuhari Attanayake. Turnipseed will host a book signing for his recently published books, […]]]>

Elementary teacher Julie Turnipseed, English Learner (ELL) from the Wentzville School District, recently announced the introduction of two new books in her The Adventures of Charlee and Magnolia series. Turnipseed’s easy-to-read rhyming children’s books were published by Inovie Books and illustrated by Muthuhari Attanayake.

Turnipseed will host a book signing for his recently published books, where readers will have the opportunity to meet the author, as well as his daughters and dogs who feature in the series. Children will have a space to read and then create their own book reviews.

The first volume of the series Become friends released in April 2021 and focuses on reuniting the dogs of Turnipseed for the very first time. Released in September, the second book Snow lots of fun! shows how Charlee and her family help Magnolia overcome her fear of snow.

Don’t give up, Magnolia and Charlie and Magnolia meet Chico should be released in November. The books feature the shy Magnolia trying to conquer the stairs, as well as learning Spanish from a new Chihuahua neighborhood.

Turnipseed is a teacher at Prairie View Elementary in Dardenne Prairie, Missouri. This more than 20 year veteran of teaching is currently working with students from Brazil, China, Honduras, India, Mexico and Pakistan in the Wentzville School District.


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Maggie Shipstead: Bringing Adventure Books https://manderfeld.info/maggie-shipstead-bringing-adventure-books/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 23:06:22 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/maggie-shipstead-bringing-adventure-books/ At the end of October, novelist Maggie Shipstead was packing her bags for her first international trip since the pandemic – to England for the announcement of the Booker Prize for which her novel “Large CircleHas been preselected. Although Shipstead didn’t win, her third novel, about a female pilot who disappears as she tries to […]]]>

At the end of October, novelist Maggie Shipstead was packing her bags for her first international trip since the pandemic – to England for the announcement of the Booker Prize for which her novel “Large CircleHas been preselected. Although Shipstead didn’t win, her third novel, about a female pilot who disappears as she tries to circle the globe from north to south, was both a bestseller and a critical success. Shipstead, who lives in Los Angeles, also writes regularly for Outside and other travel publications.

BOOKS: What have you read now or recently?

BOAT: I just read “Colson Whitehead”Sagging port“, which is such a late summer book. It made me laugh. I read quite a few mysteries, this is my kind of popcorn. I recently read Sujata Massey”The Prince of Bombay“, the third in the series. They all take place in Bombay in the early 1920s and represent the first female lawyer in India. I like the puzzle element of the mysteries. I’m not so invested in how they play out. end well that I burn mysteries which have arbitrary revelations.

BOOKS: What are your favorite mystery series?

BOAT: The Books of Elizabeth George. They are big and there is a big crossing line with several characters. That’s what makes me come back to a series, is to appreciate the characters that are perpetuated. I really like the mysteries of PD James and those of JK Rowling, which she writes under the name of Robert Galbraith.

BOOKS: How would you describe yourself as a reader?

BOAT: I’m not trying to keep up with everything that’s new. I’m going to go on a hit with a certain author. I was on Sue Miller kick last summer after reading her novel “Monogamy, which I really appreciated. I read threesome fiction for non-fiction. I really liked the climber Mark Synnott “The third pole”, Which is a mountaineering book on the historical question of whether George Mallory and Sandy Irvine reached the summit of Mount Everest. I have read quite a few books on mountaineering. I am not a mountaineer but I like adventure books. I liked that of Kate Harris “Land of lost frontiers», Which talks about her cycling on the Silk Road. I am endlessly captivated by businesses that require this kind of inner courage.

BOOKS: What’s the last classic you read?

BOAT: I took a trip for a magazine assignment on finding snow leopards. Of course, I must have read Peter Matthiessen “The snow leopard. “He was away for months and never saw a snow leopard. I was there eight days and saw four. It gave me an idea of ​​how lucky I was.

BOOKS: What are the most unusual places you’ve found yourself reading a book?

BOAT: I remember reading “The boys in the boat”When I was in Antarctica. Someone had left it on the ship. While I was writing my novel “to surprise me, I was in Bali. I hadn’t heard of “The secret story”And I didn’t know who Donna Tartt was, but I found it in a second-hand bookstore and bought it because I liked the title. It was so hot that I read the novel standing in a swimming pool while wearing a huge hat.

BOOKS: What was your last best reading?

BOAT: When I was in the Canadian Arctic, I read “” by Min Jin LeeFree food for millionaires. “I was really engrossed in it. I liked the fine granularity of the life of all the characters. It was reminiscent of Elena Ferrante’s books. One of my great lessons from Ferrante’s books is that her characters change colors. ‘notice all the time. I think it’s unusual in fiction but in real life we ​​wobble all the time, like his characters do. I felt like Lee’s novel had that too.

BOOKS: What books did you take with you to England?

BOAT: Some galleys, including “Sankofa”By Chibundu Onuzo and Hernan Diaz’s“Confidence. “It’s probably optimistic to bring two.

BOOKS: Have you read the other novels on the Booker’s shortlist?

BOAT: I do not have. I thought about it, but decided not, maybe later. You better go and assume they’re all equally bright and that I love them all.

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter @GlobeBiblio. Amy Sutherland is the author, most recently, of “Save Penny Jane»And can be reached at amysutherland@mac.com.


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ATV Adventures: Travel the trail to Cedar Point | News, Sports, Jobs https://manderfeld.info/atv-adventures-travel-the-trail-to-cedar-point-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 15:36:15 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/atv-adventures-travel-the-trail-to-cedar-point-news-sports-jobs/ Overlooking Poison Spring Canyon from Cedar Point. Looking down on the Dirty Devil River from Cedar Point. Looking north into Poison Spring Canyon from Cedar Point. Lynn Blamires, special for the standard examiner Overlooking Poison Spring Canyon from Cedar Point. Garfield County is one of the least populated counties in the state, but it is […]]]>

Lynn Blamires, special for the standard examiner

Overlooking Poison Spring Canyon from Cedar Point.

Garfield County is one of the least populated counties in the state, but it is also one of the most picturesque. Two of the most scenic roads in the country pass through this county.

Scenic Byway 12 – Utah’s All-American Road – is ranked in the Top 10 Scenic Byway in America by Car and Driver magazine. This unique route winds through slippery rock canyons, red rock cliffs, alpine mountains, national and state parks, and quaint rural towns.

Scenic Byway 143, nicknamed Utah’s Patchwork Parkway, follows the historic migration route used by the ancient Anasazi. In 1864, the pioneers took this road to Parowan, forced to walk on quilts to avoid sinking into the deep snow at the start of winter. Their goal was to obtain the flour they so badly needed to save their colony from starvation. The now famous Quilt Walk is an annual celebration in Panguitch and is the reason for the ring road’s nickname. This county also includes the famous Hole-in-the-Rock Pioneer Trail and the beautiful Burr Trail.

The landscape is so rugged that it is amazing that we have roads that touch the heart of this spectacular hinterland. One is tempted to take one of the many dirt roads that branch off from these highways. You can go to a remarkable viewpoint or a narrow canyon, but they should not be taken on a whim. The news is full of people who had not planned a particular adventure in the backcountry.

No less scenic are Highways 95 to Blanding and 276 to Bullfrog Valley. We disembarked at kilometer 20 of Highway 95 south of Hanksville to get to Cedar Point. This is the same location we organized to hike the Poison Springs Canyon Trail to the Dirty Devil River.

Lynn Blamires, special for the standard examiner

Looking down on the Dirty Devil River from Cedar Point.

Our starting point was on the west side of the highway. Riding east, we crossed and passed Lone Cedar Reservoir – a run-of-the-mill pond that I might have missed if I hadn’t seen it on the map.

Our drive to the point was pretty flat, but it carved a trail through a cedar forest which was anything but boring. We came across a lot of dead cedars scattered grotesquely on the ground. This is the kind of place that would be scary to walk through late at night, lit only by the light of a full moon.

Interestingly, this area is officially recognized as an International Dark Sky Park. This means that there is no light pollution you need to mitigate to see what the sky really looks like at night. I would like to see the starry splendor of a moonless night sky.

We continued our journey to the point, which was only 900 feet higher than where we started. However, nothing we saw along our way to the point prepared us for the panorama that opened up before us when we reached our destination.

It was the end of the course because we couldn’t go any further. The point we stopped at gradually fell to the edge of a cliff with a view of the Dirty Devil River far below. We didn’t want to ride to the edge as there was no trail.

Lynn Blamires, special for the standard examiner

Looking north into Poison Spring Canyon from Cedar Point.

We walked to the edge for a better view. Standing where we were at 6,000 feet, we looked at 2,000 feet into Poison Spring Canyon. We were at a point downstream from where we had crossed the river when we crossed the same canyon earlier.

There is a phenomenon that occurs when riding on trails like this. Our perspective was limited to negotiating the nuances of the trail and the things we could sometimes see through the trees. Then, upon arriving at the point, our view was suddenly limitless to where we could see for miles.

Looking into the canyon we could see the trail of the Dirty Devil River as it meandered through Lake Powell, sinking deeper into the canyon floor and carving and shaping the canyon walls as it went. ‘she was sinking. Even from here, the Dirty Devil is dirty.

Our guide, Ray Golden, pointed out the features of the terrain until our Panorama Palaces were satisfied. Taking one last look, we returned to where we had come from, completing a journey of about 28 miles.

This trail is suitable for side-to-side vehicles and jeeps and is available for riding when mountain trails are out of season. When you go, take plenty of water, keep the rubber side, and enjoy this spectacular view of Poison Spring Canyon.

Contact Lynn R. Blamires at quadmanone@gmail.com.

Bulletin

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Innovative educator: Meridian Museum’s program director helps guide children on their learning adventures https://manderfeld.info/innovative-educator-meridian-museums-program-director-helps-guide-children-on-their-learning-adventures/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 13:11:00 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/innovative-educator-meridian-museums-program-director-helps-guide-children-on-their-learning-adventures/ MÉRIDIEN, Idaho – Editor’s Note: This content is sponsored by CapEd Credit Union. The Children’s Museum of Idaho is a place of adventure, discovery, creativity and imagination for children aged two to eight. When children enter the Meridian Museum with their parents, grandparents or guardians, they enter a wonderful world. They find a dinosaur pit […]]]>

MÉRIDIEN, Idaho – Editor’s Note: This content is sponsored by CapEd Credit Union.


The Children’s Museum of Idaho is a place of adventure, discovery, creativity and imagination for children aged two to eight. When children enter the Meridian Museum with their parents, grandparents or guardians, they enter a wonderful world.

They find a dinosaur pit where they can dig for fossils, a pirate ship they can steer, a grocery store where they can play buyer, a doctor’s office where they can play a very large version of Operation. , and a tabletop train display where they can play conductor, to name a few of the interactive exhibits.

“We have a lot of kids who just have never experienced these things, and their adult in them can play and learn, question and dress, experience new things,” said Erin Brown, program director for the museum.

Brown has been the program director of the nonprofit Children’s Museum of Idaho since it opened in December 2018.

“I try to empower the kids to experience the whole world,” Brown said. “I mean we’re not just here in Idaho; to open our eyes and see other things. I try to bring other things so they can see and experience it. . “

In addition to the major exhibits, the museum offers programs that Brown sets up. She calls her favorite “Let’s Get Messy”.

“We make all kinds of things. We make slime. We make oobleck. We make snow,” Brown said. “I just took it out to my bedroom and we opened it up for the kids to come in to play and explore and touch.”

Brown also brings in presenters, including the Idaho National Guard from Gowen Field in Boise.

“I called Gowen and they brought out military trucks, so the kids could get dressed and climb all over their trucks,” Brown said.

Brown also runs three-day camps, like the sloth camp.

“We don’t have sloths in Idaho, and sloths are pretty cool,” Brown said. “So we read about them and learned what they eat and how they move, and then we decided to dress like a sloth and did a sloth parade through the museum.”

So many adventures. So many experiences. So much to imagine.

“I just want them to know that they can be whatever they want to be,” Brown said. “It’s good to change your mind. Just explore and have fun like a kid.”

The museum is non-profit. Admission is $ 9 for these two people or more. You can also purchase a subscription. Although it is aimed at children aged two to eight, officials say older siblings are certainly welcome to come and play with their younger siblings and guide them through the activities. The museum is just off the Meridian Road exit of I-84 near Winco.

Teachers, for more information on submitting a classroom grant application through the Idaho CapEd Foundation, visit www.capedfoundation.org.
If you would like to nominate an innovative educator who goes above and beyond, email us at innovanteducator@ktvb.com.

See each episode in our YouTube Playlist:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries


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7 fall / winter adventures in Northern California + what to equip https://manderfeld.info/7-fall-winter-adventures-in-northern-california-what-to-equip/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 10:29:47 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/7-fall-winter-adventures-in-northern-california-what-to-equip/ Just because summer is over doesn’t mean the adventures of the year are over. In Northern California, they are just getting started. Benefiting from a mildly cool and cool climate in the Bay Area and a snow-capped wonderland of mountain peaks just beyond, fall and winter at NorCal can fuel just about any outdoor activity. […]]]>

Just because summer is over doesn’t mean the adventures of the year are over. In Northern California, they are just getting started.

Benefiting from a mildly cool and cool climate in the Bay Area and a snow-capped wonderland of mountain peaks just beyond, fall and winter at NorCal can fuel just about any outdoor activity. air you can imagine, from mountaineering to trail running. These seven epic adventures will have you exploring throughout the spring, whether you stay close to home or head to the Sierra.


Just make sure you equip yourself properly. Our pairs of high performance clothing from Goldwin, the Japanese adventure outfitter with a store in Jackson Square in San Francisco, is the icing on the cake, warm and waterproof.

Hike the Lost Coast

The lost coast

(Bob Wick, BLM / CC)

Adventure: hiking

The solitary Lost Coast Trail is one of the last remaining stretches of raw and isolated coastal landscape in California. Most backpackers head to its iconic northern section, which winds 40km from the beach to the cliff top and back (the less popular 32km-long southern section pulls away from the seaside to cross the park. ‘Sinkyone Wilderness Wooded State). The Upper Lost Coast Trail takes two to three days to complete, starting at the Mattole trailhead, ending at Shelter Cove, and camping along the way in one of the many freshwater streams that empty into the Pacific.

As you hike, rocky coasts join with frolicking seals, barking sea lions and breathtaking sunsets. And while the elevation remains fairly stable throughout, this trip isn’t exactly easy: you won’t just be doing miles through the deep sand, but there are three different stretches where the trail becomes impassable at high tide. . Getting caught in these sections at the wrong time of day can be fatal. Permits are required to hike the Lost Coast Trail and you will have the best chance of securing your preferred dates if you book early (year permits are issued the previous year on October 1).

Equipment: Fast Shell Light Jacket

Stay warm and dry in foggy and humid autumn and winter weather along the Lost Humboldt Coast in the Lightweight Fast Shell Jacket ($ 330) from Goldwin. The waterproof hooded shell is lightweight and folds down small to fit easily in your bag.

Road race on West Cliff Drive in Santa Cruz


West Cliff Drive passes through Natural Bridges State Park.

(Paul Komarek / CC)

Adventure: road racing

Lose yourself in the beauty of Monterey Bay on this run along Santa Cruz West Cliff Walk. The paved and marked route begins at the Santa Cruz Pier, the longest wooden pier on the west coast, and then climbs before reaching Seal Rock and Lighthouse Point. From there, the road enters Natural Bridges State Beach with its rocky arches and slippery pelicans. As you run the waves will keep time, crashing under the 7.6 mile cliff side trail (for a shorter 6 mile run, start and end where Bay Street crosses West Cliff). In good weather, the view stretches all the way to Monterey on the south shore of the bay.

Equipment: compact jacket

At any time of the year, ocean winds can slice through West Cliff Drive like icy knives. Keep it at bay with the Goldwin packable Compact jacket ($ 170). The eco-friendly recycled nylon windbreaker features ventilation and reflective accents for better visibility at night.

Hike to Mount Diablo


The summit of Mount Diablo

(Annette Teng / CC)

Adventure: hiking

Summit four peaks in one day on one of Northern California’s most arduous and rewarding hikes. The 15 miles long Four Peaks Loop To Mount Diablo State Park is unforgiving – the trail has an elevation gain of over 6,000 feet and takes about eight hours – but the views alone are worth it. On a clear winter day, you can see as far as the Farallon Islands to the west and Mt Lassen to the north.

Begin your hike at the Mitchell Canyon Trailhead. From there the road winds and winds through oak and chaparral to the top of Mount Olympia, then to the top of North Peak. From there you will continue to Mount Diablo, the sacred place of creation of the Miwok Indians, followed by a stop at distant Eagle Peak, before descending the ridge again.

The equipment: Fly Air puffer jacket

The weather works differently at high altitudes, quickly changing from hot and sunny to windy and freezing. The Fly Air puffer jacket ($ 370) from Goldwin will make sure you are ready for whatever the sky throws at you. Its lightweight baffle design is made of a high quality eco-friendly material stuffed with down and packs away small on the go.

Rock climbing at Pinnacles National Park


Pinnacles National Park

(Kee Yip / CC)

Adventure: climbing

There are those who would say that climbing the rocky fingers of Pinnacles National Park is more difficult than climbing the granite walls of the neighboring Sierra: the volcanic rock here is so brittle and unpredictable that wedges can spring from the cliff wall. But what is an adventure without a little danger? It’s part of what places Pinnacles’ iconic Fairy Chimneys among the most rock formations worthy of climbing, not just in California but across the country.

There are a number of different routes climbers can take to the park and, despite all the crumbling rock, you don’t need to be an expert to climb – there are easy and intermediate routes to First Sister, Ordeal, and Wet Kiss among others. Just be sure to research your route in advance. Some formations close between January and July to protect the nesting sites of hawks and eagles.

The equipment: One Tuck tapered stretch pants

Get a full range of motion on and off the wall One Tuck tapered stretch pants ($ 190) from Goldwin. These comfy pants are made from four-way stretch polyester that resists wear, tear, and unexpected downpours.

Snow sports at Heavenly Resort


Heavenly Resort, Lake Tahoe

(Adam Baker / CC)

Adventure: Ski and Snowboard

From famed Squaw Valley to Little Bear Valley, Tahoe has no shortage of powder. But a seaside resort, Celestial, accumulates more superlatives than any other combined, including the most skiable acres (4,630), highest elevation (10,067 feet), and most vertical feet on the West Coast (3,500). Almost 100 trails crisscross Heavenly’s diverse landscape, not to mention the expert-level backcountry at Mott and Killebrew Canyons. There are also two snow parks filled with dozens of rails and jumps for tricks of all kinds. The 2021 season kicks off November 19 with adult day passes starting at $ 91.

The equipment: Arris jacket

Stay warm in the mountains with Goldwin’s Arris jacket ($ 760). The windproof and waterproof design takes every detail into account: think underarm ventilation, airgel pockets to protect your smartphone, and a hoodie that can accommodate your helmet.

Running at Mount Tamalpais State Park


Mount Tamalpaias State Park

(Bastian Hoppe / CC)

Adventure: trail running

Race through foggy redwoods and along windswept hills in Mount Tamalpais State Park. Almost 60 miles of trails circle the mountain, many of them with such compelling views of San Francisco and the Pacific that even the fastest will find themselves slowing their pace. The 6.5 mile Matt Davis-Steep Ravine Loop, which winds through wooded canyons and past waterfalls, is regularly voted one of the best in the Bay Area. The trail begins and ends at Belvedere Avenue in the town of Stinson Beach. Once your run is over, you’ll find several places within a few blocks to reward your efforts with a cool drink or two.

The equipment: Breeze 5 inch woven shorts (with mesh lining)

Stay cool on the track with a pair of Breeze 5 inch woven shorts (with mesh lining) ($ 130) from Goldwin. Made from eco-friendly recycled polyester, these running shorts have an antibacterial mesh inner lining and reflective logos for better visibility after the sun goes down.

Mountaineering in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks


Thor Peak, Mount Whitney, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

(Penny Higgens / CC)

Adventure: mountaineering

Escalation Mount Whitney, the highest peak of the lower 48, is an adventure anytime of the year. But when winter comes down on Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and Whitney’s 99 switchbacks turn into channels of ice and snow, explorers head for the Winter mountaineers route, a 12-mile trail with an elevation gain of 6,200 feet that only crampons and ice axes can conquer. The climate will put your mountaineering skills to the test, but it won’t take long to remember why you’re here: the summit is most spectacular in winter, with mirrored frozen lakes and snow-white slopes that sparkle in the sun. Unlike the summer months, when prior permits are required and the trails are crowded with backpackers, after November 1, you will be one of the few intrepid climbers on the mountain.

Equipment: Gore-Tex Fly-Air Pullover

Don’t even think about climbing Mount Whitney in the winter without a warm jacket that will protect you from the wind and the elements. by Goldwin Gore-Tex Fly-Air sweater ($ 730) is designed for mountaineering with a helmet compatible hood and a leg loop at the hem to prevent the jacket from riding up while scaling the ice.

This article was written by Shoshi Parks.

// Shop for men’s and women’s clothing at the San Francisco store, 444 Jackson St. (Jackson Square), goldwin-sports.com. Thank you to our partners at Goldwin.


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Fall adventures: it’s off-season travel season https://manderfeld.info/fall-adventures-its-off-season-travel-season/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 09:34:26 +0000 https://manderfeld.info/fall-adventures-its-off-season-travel-season/ Manchester in foggy october? Madrid in cool November? Gothenburg for six hours of sunshine a day in December? This may not seem like the most obvious list of trips for fall and winter, but it’s the one that crossed my mind over the past month. In fact, I spent the weekend happily ticking off the […]]]>

Manchester in foggy october? Madrid in cool November? Gothenburg for six hours of sunshine a day in December?

This may not seem like the most obvious list of trips for fall and winter, but it’s the one that crossed my mind over the past month. In fact, I spent the weekend happily ticking off the first item.

During a luxurious four-day break, I wandered the beautiful red brick streets of Manchester – a large brolly in hand – dipping into the most fabulous restaurants and warming myself in a hotel with a steam-heated swimming pool.

It would never, with all due respect to our northern cities, before Covid.

In the fall, I’m more likely to be found exploring one of the 10 nicest cities like Amsterdam or Bruges, or more likely in the heart of Manhattan’s lush green streets.



All of my travel outlook has changed – and not necessarily in the way I expected

And in the depths of winter, when Seasonal Affective Disorder makes me about as much fun as Miss Havisham on a downhill run, I usually have one thing on my mind: pure, unadulterated sunshine.

But faced with lateral flow and mismanaged queues at airports, as well as severe ground restrictions or curfews in many of my favorite places – not to mention outright bans by Britons in some – my gut reaction this time was: no thanks. I can make food, pamper myself and explore new territories here in the UK.

Turns out, on this side of the pandemic, all of my travel outlook has changed – and not necessarily in the way I expected.

Manchester’s Castlefield district comes into its own in the fall

(Getty Images)

Now, when I have a week or a long weekend to explore, the traditional considerations that would help me narrow down a destination – reliable sunshine in the depths of winter, for example, or supposedly comfortable fall vibes – have been replaced by a simple desire and contentment to just go somewhere.

But not just anywhere: my new priority is a destination requiring the absolute minimum of travel administrator.

As such, I find myself intrigued by completely random places, those that never came close to the top 50 on my bucket list before the pandemic – or did, but only during certain peak tourism periods. of the year.

Now it’s a melee. Estonia does not require a pre-travel test? Delicious. Zero Paperwork Northumberland has windy boardwalks and cozy fire-lit inns to hide in? Sign me up.

Without these reimagined travel priorities, I might never have fallen for Manchester’s daring and avant-garde food scene, or its peaceful canal area lined with flame-colored leaves.

I’m suddenly wowed by the thought of four days in Spain’s capital of art and gastronomy, Madrid – locked in a comfortable hotel with a decadent and velvety aesthetic, hopping between sumptuous tapas bars after its four hours of light have faded, and dodging bustling streets into opulent and resonant museums.

Meanwhile, places like Abu Dhabi’s winter paradise (riddled with confusing testing rules) and Thailand (opening but with warnings of curfews, alcohol bans, and venue closures. entertainment) have completely fallen off my radar.



I’m suddenly won over by the idea of ​​four days in Spain’s capital of art and food, Madrid – hopping between lavish tapas bars and dodging bustling streets in opulent and resonant museums.

Travel writer Helen Ochyra, who has spent autumns in the Canary Islands or Australia, agrees. This weekend, she takes off on an unusually little exotic getaway in the Surrey Hills.

“With the tests and quarantine posts constantly evolving, and the fact that I now have a toddler and baby, traveling further seems a bit too risky,” she explains. Being “close to home, but more importantly close to several excellent wineries and cozy pubs”, Surrey will do the trick – at least this year.

Fellow travel journalist Nick Nomi has also changed his usual tastes, setting his sights on the Isle of Skye in Scotland for the fall and the spectacular Welsh countryside for the winter.

“I have used Croatia to test the water on overseas trips and honestly found the process quite difficult. The return to the UK in particular was a bit complicated as the systems didn’t work quite as expected, ”says Nomi.

“But I visited Skye recently and found it fascinating and without crowds. The train trip was a delight with no problems. And I wanted to go to Wales for a long time but never made it – the snow covered hills (or fog) look like a great substitute for flying to Iceland or Norway in winter so i ‘hope to repeat the success I have had with Scotland and find some peace away from the crowds.

Northumberland is grimly beautiful in winter

(Getty Images / iStockphoto)

In normal times (rather than “new normal”), the travel industry relies on traditional travel “seasons”: ski season, cruise season, summer vacation season, winter sun season . The idea is that most of the public wants to go where you’re supposed to want to go, when you’re supposed to want to go – either to enjoy the best weather, a local event or phenomenon or just to see that place. at its finest.

But in recent years, tour operators and travel writers have grown increasingly interested in off-season travel and its cousin, “shoulder season,” when you fly to a place outside of its most popular months for. catch it without crowds, more authentic feeling or live different and unique local experiences.



I chose to see this era of travel for what it really is: to be creative

Idyllic off-season trips I have taken in the past include Japan in January – no puffs of cherry blossom cotton candy, that’s right, but icy blue skies, cool sunny winter and scenery. snowfall similar to that of Narnia in the north.

Then there was Athens and the neighboring Greek island of Hydra at the end of October – always warm and sleepy at the archaeological sites, the sea at 21 ° C pleasant for daily dives, and with a much less touristy vibe. and more dominated by locals.

Rather than grumble about the chaos of on-going travel and the ever-changing checklists for different adventures, I choose to see this age of travel for what it really is: get creative.

This will be perhaps the most off-season of all – the revival of year-end travel where vacation destinations large and small are knocked down in a bingo machine, randomly turned and knocked over, for the most. great pleasure for us with itchy feet, travelers who have been upset for a long time.


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